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Report

Cloud Automation as a Service: Now Ready for Prime Time

As companies continue to develop private clouds and selectively adopt the public cloud for some of their business apps, the benefits of hybrid cloud are becoming increasingly clear. A hybrid cloud architecture brings together private and public clouds into a single platform, delivering not just well-known cloud benefits such as near-infinite scalability and consumption-based, pay-as-you-go services, but also a whole new level of agility and deployment flexibility.

While two-thirds of companies today are running a traditional datacenter or private cloud architecture, Taneja Group research indicates that more than half expect to move to a hybrid cloud within the next two to three years. This trend extends to business applications as well, which are being adapted to run in the public cloud. True hybrid architectures offer application portability and a compatible cross-cloud runtime environment, effectively enabling workloads to operate seamlessly across public and private clouds and allowing customers to choose to deploy workloads when and where they best fit.

One of the challenges companies face when moving to a hybrid cloud is how best to automate and manage their hybrid cloud infrastructure and applications. Self-service for users and developers is an essential attribute of a hybrid cloud, and the only way to effectively enable self-service capabilities is through cloud automation. Up until recently, management and automation have primarily been done using traditional on-premises IT toolsets, extended to accommodate the cloud. But this approach is often a compromise, since toolsets originally designed for an on-premises data center can be less than optimal in a new cloud-based paradigm.

To overcome the limitations of traditional IT infrastructure and application toolsets, many companies are looking to adopt an as-a-service approach to automation and management. This approach has some key advantages, especially in a hybrid cloud world.  For example, as companies move to a hybrid cloud, they will find a need for automation solutions that simply and transparently span private and public cloud boundaries and provide a consistent interface across their cloud environments. Cloud automation as-a-service solutions are ideally suited to meet this requirement, since they are not tied to any particular system, cloud or location.

In this paper, we’ll look at the growing market awareness of a services approach to cloud automation, and the factors that are motivating IT buyers to consider adopting an as-a-service approach in place of or in addition to traditional on-premises tools.

We’ll then examine the key characteristics and use cases buyers are looking for in cloud automation services and the benefits they expect to achieve. Finally, we’ll look at a specific example of a vendor-delivered cloud automation as-a-service offering: VMware vRealize Automation Cloud. We will show how such cloud automation services are being used and the advantages they are bringing to a growing number of companies.  

Publish date: 08/30/19
Report

End-to-End NVMe Storage: Is your enterprise ready?

In the past few years, flash technology has transformed the storage market forever. Today, flash-first arrays are the new normal. We believe the new NVMe-oF shared storage protocol combined with the advent of a broad range of NVMe-based devices including SCM will prove as disruptive to the external storage market over the next five years as NAND flash technology was in the recent past.

Read this Market Perspective to understand why now is the time to ask your storage vendors important questions about their array architectures, what questions to ask them, and how to interpret the answers. Arrays that efficiently read and write to SAS-based SSDs won’t see much gain from switching their backend to NVMe until the frontend also supports NVMe-oF. This report will explain why, when, and how this shift will take place.  

Publish date: 08/30/19
Profile

When Comparing Cloud Alternatives, For the Best TCO Leverage VMware Cloud Foundation

In this paper we examine the relative costs and other advantages of four different cloud infrastructure approaches, two based on private or on-premises clouds and two on public clouds. These public and private approaches can in turn be combined to create a hybrid cloud deployment. The objective is to enable businesses to evaluate which cloud approach makes the most sense for them, based on differences in TCO and other relevant factors.

Public clouds are here to stay, given their large and growing adoption by businesses and consumers alike. Now well over a decade since AWS first launched its infrastructure-as-a-service offerings, public clouds have become a popular deployment choice for both new and legacy business applications. Based on Taneja Group research, nearly every business is now running at least some of its use cases and applications in one or more public clouds. Clouds offer customers greater agility and near-infinite scalability, in addition to a flexible pay-as-you-go consumption model.

However, a large majority of businesses have decided they cannot rely on public clouds alone to satisfy their IT needs. Instead, they see hybrid clouds as a better architectural choice, enabling them to realize all the advantages of a public cloud along with broader use case support and a more flexible deployment model. More than two-thirds of IT professionals who participated in two recent Taneja Group research studies favor hybrid clouds as their long-term architecture.

For the on-premises or private cloud component of a hybrid cloud, the majority of users are starting with VMware technology and typically use two different approaches: a traditional, integrated 3-tier architecture commonly called Converged Infrastructure (CI); or a fully software-defined approach based on Hyperconverged Infrastructure (HCI). The 3-tier, CI approach utilizes loosely integrated compute, storage and networking resources, while the easiest and most comprehensive approach is based on VMware Cloud Foundation, a software-defined data center platform. Our analysis demonstrates that the software-defined VMware Cloud Foundation approach provides a simpler, more cost-effective approach to building on-premises or private cloud infrastructure.

Looking to the public cloud, businesses have a choice of whether to move all or just a subset of their on-premises workloads to the public cloud, and either run them there permanently or in hybrid fashion. We have analyzed the relative costs and advantages of two major ways to migrate and run workloads in the public cloud: moving on-premises workloads to a native public cloud infrastructure, such as native Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure or Google Cloud Platform; or moving them to a VMware Cloud Foundation-based public cloud, such as VMware Cloud on AWS or VMware Cloud Foundation offered as a service by one of the VMware Cloud Provider Program (VCPP) partners. As we’ll see, moving to a native public cloud infrastructure requires often significant upfront refactoring and migration effort, which gives the path to a VMware Cloud Foundation-based public cloud a major cost advantage.

Based on our in-depth costing and qualitative analysis of the two private and two public cloud approaches, we found that clouds based on VMware Cloud Foundation technology offer the lowest TCO over a three-year period. VMware Cloud Foundation-based clouds minimize risk by starting with proven and widely deployed VMware technology on premises and enabling full application compatibility and workload portability between your on-premises environment and your choice of one or more VMware-compatible public clouds. VMware Cloud Foundation-enabled clouds will help you to optimize your path to a hybrid cloud deployment.

Publish date: 05/21/19
Profile

HPE 3PAR Performance Insights: Bringing InfoSight Analytics to the Edge

In an era in which every tech company claims to have an AI offering, HPE InfoSight stands out as the genuine article. HPE InfoSight is a best-in-class AI solution that uses cloud-based machine learning to provide global insights into the status and health of infrastructure, removing much of the management burden and helping customers to solve some of their most challenging IT problems. In particular, HPE InfoSight delivers cross-stack insights into a storage array’s health, configuration, capacity and performance based on near-real time analytics and the knowledge gained from a vast treasure trove of field data collected over many years.

Among a seemingly endless set of over-hyped AI solutions, HPE InfoSight is delivering remarkable results and significantly enriching the customer experience. The solution has reduced support incidents across more than 50,000 connected HPE 3PAR storage systems by 85%, while lowering operating expenses by nearly 80%. With its unmatched track record, HPE InfoSight has become the leader in AI-driven operations for the Hybrid Cloud and an essential asset for HPE 3PAR customers.

Now InfoSight technology is being incorporated into a new solution at the edge, which is enabling HPE 3PAR customers to better understand, anticipate and improve array performance. As we’ll see, HPE Performance Insights for 3PAR Storage takes an innovative approach to helping IT managers track storage performance and deliver it when and where it’s needed most, based on the power and intelligence of InfoSight’s AI and machine learning technologies.

Publish date: 11/30/18
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